Basic Rule of Composition

The arrangement of visual elements in an image. To emphasize the subject, mood, action of an image and make it both easily understood and aesthetically pleasing to the viewer.

The compositing and Editing includes Color, Shape, Line, Contrast, Positioning, Viewpoint, Rhythm, Perspective, Proportion and Geometry.

Click on Link: Editing and Color Correction

 

Basically, it includes everything in an image.

6 Basic Rule of Composition

[1] The Rule of Thirds

Divide your image into thirds and place your focal points near the intersections.

The Rule of Thirds

The Golden Means

Divide your image into eights and place your focal points near the intersection of 3/8 & 5/8.

The Golden Means

This results in a more pleasing, balanced image.

The Golden Means
The Golden Means
The Golden Means

Do not bisect your image horizontally or vertically. Do not place important objects too close to the edge.

The Golden Means
The Golden Means

[2] Positioning

Besides the rule f thirds or the Golden Mean, there are some other guidelines for positioning the focal points in image:

1. A central Composition can be compelling and attention-grabbing, Symmetry enhances the feeling of respect, authority and dignity.

 Positioning

2. For a more dynamic image, make sure you vary the heights and sizes of your image elements.

Positioning

3. Unless you want to show that those elements are the equal point of view.

4. The Heavier the visual “Weight” of an image element, the nearer is should be placed in the middle of your image. Think of how you balance unequal weights on a seesaw. Also known as the “Fulcrum-lever” principle.

Positioning
Positioning

5. To create depth and interest, overlap objects in the image.

Positioning

6. Beware of Tangents which are areas where a line or object just touches another line or object.

Positioning

[3] Shapes and Lines

1. Horizontal Shapes are perceived as stable and calm.

Shapes and Lines

2. Vertical Shapes imply energy and growth.

Shapes and Lines

3. Diagonal Shapes are the Most Dynamic. They can imply movement or tension.

Shapes and Lines

4. Think about the mood of the image and the shapes that fit that mood. If an image feels boring, it probably needs more diagonals. Curves are more dangerous.

Shapes and Lines
Shapes and Lines

5. Triangles are a solid compositional shape. Arranging the focal points of your image in a triangular pattern leads the eye around the page.

Shapes and Lines

6. Circles also catch the viewer attention. You can use this to your advantage by flagging your focal point with a circle.

Shapes and Lines

[4] Rhythm and Repetition

1. Repeating the same types of shapes or lines within your image creates a pleasant rhythmic flow which you can also strategically break, to create a focal point or show contrast.

Rhythm and Repetition
Rhythm and Repetition
Rhythm and Repetition

2. Repeating similar elements in an organized arrangement emphasizes structure and formality whereas similar clustering elements create a more natural layout.

Rhythm and Repetition
Rhythm and Repetition

[5] Cropping

The way you crop image helps give it context. Plus some types of the image fit more naturally in a horizontal Space or vertical space. When you have a choice, use this to your advantage.

1. Landscapes often work well in a horizontal orientation. When the background overshadows a figure, the image becomes more focused on the power of the environment rather than the figure.

Cropping

2. Portraits or full-body image often fit well in a vertical orientation. Cropping an image closer to a figure brings the focus to the figure thoughts or actions. Never crop a figure at a joint such as neck, knee, wrist, waist, elbow, etc.

Cropping

3. A Vertical orientation helps to emphasize a height difference. Cropping off part of an action or object gives an illusion that it continues beyond the frame.

Cropping

4. Cropping out unnecessary objects or backgrounds can help bring focus to your subject.

Cropping
Cropping

5. Leaving room in front of a perceived action helps to create a sense of movement and space.

6. Allowing some extra room in the direction that a face is looking also helps to create “space”.

Cropping
Cropping

[6] Viewpoint

The Viewpoint you choose influences the viewer understanding of your illustration and which figure they identify with.

1. Viewing a figure or object from a low angle makes it appear dominant or intimidating.

Viewpoint

2. Unsurprisingly, viewing a figure or scene from a high angle has the opposite effect.

Viewpoint

3. Viewing a separate scene from within illustration can be a great way of showing a division or contrast. It is also a nice framing device.

Viewpoint

4. The Viewer will tend to identify with whatever character is most visible. Generally, it is the character that is closer to the viewer but could also be the character (3D Animation Movie) with the most readable face.

Viewpoint
Viewpoint

Keep this in mind if you are trying to show a hero/villain showdown.

Kshitij Vivaan (Training Partner of MAAC Ahmadabad C.G Road) offers career courses in Animation, VFX, graphics, web designing & compositing editing plus for students from different cities of Gujarat such as Bhavnagar and Surendranagar. MAAC helps these students get the best job placements according to their skills and talents to get the best start to their Professional Careers.

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